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Geography

Qualifications to start the course

Students must have five GCSEs including English, Mathematics and Science graded A* – C. Additional requirements for this subject: Students must have GCSE Geography at grade B or above.

Description of the subject

The Geography AS and A2 Level course examines the causes and consequences of some of the headline global issues. Students are given the opportunity to evaluate how successful humans have been in managing the problems that have arisen over recent years. Topics such as global warming, natural disasters, globalisation, superpowers, energy security and poverty are covered.

In addition to this, you will be assessed on your ability to undertake geographical investigations and research. This element of the course includes a field trip and an independent research project.

What you will do

  • Investigate a range of local and world issues
  • Examine issues in managing the environment and resources
  • Assess questions of sustainability, growth, conservation and exploitation
  • Learn about forces influencing the environment
  • Look at how people, government and economic forces make decisions that impact on the environment
  • Field work.

Future prospects

Careers in:
Travel and Tourism, Planning – Housing, Aid Agencies, Local Government, Business, Environmental Agencies, Further Education Sector Organisations.

History

Qualifications to start the course

Students must have five GCSEs including English, Mathematics and Science graded A* – C. Additional requirements for this subject: Students must have GCSE English at grade B or above.

Description of the subject

The History course focuses on 20th century political, social and cultural changes. The course develops the students’ oral and literacy skills through the writing of extended essays, oral presentations and discussions.

The course followed is Edexcel Route F. In Year 12, Paper 1 & 2 Searching for rights and freedoms in the 20th century.These papers follow the development of the USA 1918 -1996 and examine thematic changes during this era. Paper 2 is on the Indian Independence Movement 1914-1948. In Year 13 we study the British gaining and losing an empire and the Coursework option examines the causes of and reasons for the end of the Cold War.

What you will do

  • Analyse different types of sources and develop your analytical and evaluative skills
  • Understand evidence, explanation and change
  • Discuss problems and analyse evidence
  • Write clear, well-organised explanations and evaluate conflicting interpretations.

Future prospects

  • All of these activities make an A Level in History a very useful and much sought after qualification in employment areas such as; Management, Finance, Law, Civil Service and Teaching.
  • An A Level in History will help students to prepare for courses /degrees in higher education which may lead to one of the careers above.

Religious Studies: Islam, Ethics and Philosophy

Qualifications to start the course

Students must have five GCSEs including English, Mathematics and Science graded A* – C. Additional requirements for this subject: Students must have GCSE English Language at grade B or above.

Description of the subject

Learners must study all three components.

 

Component 1: A Study of Religion

Written examination: 2 hours (33.3% of qualification)

 This component focuses on the study of Islam (option B). There will be four themes within each option: religious figures and sacred texts;

religious concepts and religious life; significant social and historical developments in religious thought; religious practices and religious identity.

Learners will be expected to answer one question from Section A out of a choice of two and one question from Section B out of a choice of three in this component.

 

Component 2: Philosophy of Religion

Written examination: 2 hours (33.3% of qualification)

 There will be four themes within this component: arguments for the existence of God; challenges to religious belief; religious experience; religious language.

Learners will be expected to answer one question from Section A out of a choice of two and one question from Section B out of a choice of three in this component.

Questions can be taken from any area of the specification.

 

Component 3: Religion and Ethics

Written examination: 2 hours (33.3% of qualification)

 There will be four themes within this component: ethical thought; deontological ethics; teleological ethics; determinism; free will. Learners will be expected to answer one question from Section A out of a choice of two and one question from Section B out of a choice of three in this component. Questions can be taken from any area of the specification.

Future prospects

Religious Studies is held in high esteem by higher education institutions. This course is an excellent foundation for degree courses in Law, Medicine, Journalism, Psychology, Theology and Philosophy. Being able to link, debate, analyse and develop your own ideas are regarded as very useful skills.

This is a good course to link up with Art, 3D Design, Business Studies, Information Technology, Media Studies, IT Practitioners and General Studies.

Philosophy

Qualifications to start the course

Students must have five GCSEs including English, Mathematicss and Science graded A* – C. Additional requirements for this subject: Students must have GCSE English at grade B or above.

Description of the subject: What will philosophy give me?

  • It will make you an independent thinker: To think for yourself is to be able to evaluate and make life choices for yourself based on a mature judgement. Philosophy trains you to do this.
  • It will make you argue. The issues debated in Philosophy have no clear answers. They have been discussed for centuries. It is challenging therefore to ask yourself these questions. Whether you come from a background of religious belief or not, your mind must be open to working out options and exploring possibilities.
  • It will give you skills: Philosophy will teach you;
    • To discuss and debate
    • To look for flaws or contradictions in arguments
    • The ability to argue
    • Imagination: coming up with your own solutions and ideas
    • Communication and conversation
    • Greater written and reading skills necessary for preparation before any university course.
  • It will give you greater self-understanding and maturity: You will gain confidence being able to think independently and reflecting upon deep questions. Furthermore it encourages open–mindedness necessary for relating in our society and feeling able to communicate your own ideas to others and, in turn, receive them. Students will explore 15 core studies; three studies from each of the five approaches: social, cognitive, physiological, development and individual differences. Philosophy students will explore various issues, debates, perspectives and methods arising from the studies.

What you will do

Year 12

Topics Covered/ Areas of Focus:The word Philosophy comes from the Ancient Greeks and can be translated to mean ‘the   love of wisdom’. The Philosophy A- level course is designed to encourage students to explore a range of classical philosophical issues, from Epistemology and Metaphysics, to Rene Descartes’ Meditations.

Through analysis, well-reasoned arguments and of course questioning, students are able to develop a wide range of skills including   evaluation, critical analysis, essay writing and reading.

At AS Level students are required to study Epistemology & Metaphysics and Philosophy of Religion. The aim of the course is to introduce students to the fundamental theories in Philosophy and develop skills required for A2 and potentially undergraduate study.

Epistemology and Metaphysics explores:

  •   What are the immediate objects of perception?
  •   The origin of concepts and the nature of knowledge
  •   The Definition of Knowledge

Philosophy of Religion explores:

  •   The Concepts of God
  •   Arguments relating to the existence of God

Year 13

Topics   Covered/ Areas of Focus:The word Philosophy comes from the Ancient Greeks and can be translated to mean ‘ the love of wisdom’. The Philosophy A- level course is designed to encourage students to explore a range of classical philosophical issues, from Epistemology and Metaphysics, to Rene Descartes’ Meditations.

At A2 students are given the opportunity to specialise further and study Ethics and Philosophy of Mind. The aim of the course is to refine and build upon skills such as the ability to ask penetrating questions, construct sound arguments and present clear and logical evaluations.

Ethics explores:

  •   Ethical Theories: How do we decide what is morally right to do?
  •   Ethical Language

Philosophy of Mind Explores:

The mind and body problem: What is the relationship between the body and the mind?

 

Future prospects

Employers want clear and analytical thinkers, which makes Philosophy an attractive subject. It is surprising just how many career paths Philosophy can lead to: Business, Banking or City firms, Accountants, Law, Politics, Civil Service, Journalism, Advertising, Teaching, Medicine – especially when taken alongside Science and Mathematics.